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2017 Seattle Seahawks Yearbook

Decade Team, which was chosen by the Hall of Fame selection committee, and prior to Saturday Easley was the only first-team selection on that All-Decade team not in the Hall of Fame. Easley becomes the fourth player in the Hall of Fame who spent his entire career in Seattle, joining fellow Ring of Honor members Steve Largent, Cortez Kennedy and Walter Jones. One person Easley credits for his induction to the Hall of Fame is fellow star safety—and 1981 first-round draft pick — Ronnie Lott, who is widely considered to be one of the best safeties in NFL history. “Ronnie Lott has been talking about Kenny Easley going into the Hall of Fame since the day I retired,” Easley said on a conference call Friday. “He kept the drum beat going, and the remarkable thing about that is that he didn’t have to. He was in the Hall of Fame… For him to say what he said about me through the years, never wavering, never ever wavering, always the same drum beat, it’s remarkable. Absolutely remarkable from a remarkable human being.” Among the things Lott said about Easley was this quote to ESPN’s Mike Sando in 2002: “Kenny could do what Jack Tatum could do, but he also could do what Mike Haynes could do. He was not only a great hitter and great intimidator on the field, but he was a great athlete. Kenny, Lawrence Taylor and those guys changed the game of football on the defensive side, because they were not just big hitters. Now all of a sudden you were seeing guys who were big hitters, but also as athletic as anyone on offense.” Current Seahawks safety Kam Chancellor, who in a nod to Easley also goes by “The Enforcer,” has known the former Seahawks great since high school, and has long seen it as an honor to be compared to Seattle’s original star safety. “He was a force to be reckoned with,” Chancellor said two years ago. “So it’s a big compliment to be compared to a player like him.” When Easley was named a finalist for the Hall of Fame last summer, Chancellor described Easley as a player who “set that mold for younger guys like myself to come up and play this game. Then just the fact that he’s from my area, he’s from Chesapeake and I’m from Norfolk, right next to each other. Learning about him in my last year of high school, doing my research on him, seeing what type of guy he was, how he played the game. I think it’s an honor to play on the same team that he played on, and being called ‘The Enforcer’ after ‘The Enforcer,’ I think it’s a great accomplishment for him and I think it’s deserving.” 63


2017 Seattle Seahawks Yearbook
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