Page 28

2016 Seattle Seahawks Yearbook

Farewell to Beast Mode Marshawn Lynch announced himself to Seahawks fans with an earth-shaking run in the playoffs. He exited with a single photo posted on Twitter fi ve years later. In between, a “Beast Quake” and an apparent retirement announcement during Super Bowl 50, Lynch became not just one of the league’s most feared running backs, but also one of the most iconic athletes in Seattle sports history. Lynch won’t go down as the greatest player in Seahawks history, not over fi rst-ballot Hall of Famers like Steve Largent and Walter Jones, but what Lynch unquestionably was during his six seasons in Seattle was one of the most important players in franchise history, particularly in light of the team’s success over the past four seasons. “He’s not carrying the football, he’s carrying his team,” offensive line coach/assistant head coach Tom Cable said last year. “That’s who he is. That’s what he does.” The ferocious style with which he ran, the swagger with which he fi nished big plays, the respect he had in Seattle’s locker room, all of that helped defi ne the style of the Pete Carroll/John Schneider-era Seahawks. When Schneider and Carroll added Lynch in a midseason trade with Buffalo during their fi rst year in Seattle, they didn’t just do it to add a ball carrier, they wanted to add attitude and toughness that to that point had been lacking. “I don’t know if anything is more symbolic than what we’ve done with Marshawn and him playing the way he’s played and him being the guy he is,” Carroll said late in the 2012 season that was the best of Lynch’s career. “I think he really is the key element to putting this thing together from the attitude perspective at least.” A franchise-altering trade that almost didn’t happen Before Lynch could become the identity of Seattle’s offense, the team’s “heart and soul,” as receiver Doug Baldwin has described him, the Seahawks fi rst had to acquire him from Buffalo. Carroll, who had coached against Lynch in college, was a big fan of the back, and he wanted to add Lynch to his team before the 2010 season. Buffalo said no to early trade proposals, and only gave in after a lot of persistence from Schneider. “We went after him for a long time, and I just kept bugging By John Boyle Story originally posted on seahawks.com on February 8, 2016 Marshawn Lynch readies to give Tracy Porter a stiff arm during his 67-yard touchdown run. 26


2016 Seattle Seahawks Yearbook
To see the actual publication please follow the link above