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2017 Seattle Seahawks Yearbook

the channel of one TV to Fox News, so now CNN and Fox News are on neighboring TVs, the NFL Network remaining on the third. “Just trying to be fair and balanced,” Kirchner jokes, referencing the cable news network’s slogan. Carroll eventually notices and reacts with mild amusement. Or maybe it’s annoyance, but either way he can’t help but laugh. As 9 a.m. and the start of on-field workouts approaches, the Seahawks’ suite continues to fill up with coaches and scouts. Receivers coach Dave Canales points out that his position group won’t be on the field today, but jokes that he’s still there anyway because of the free food. Before things get going, a contingent of scouts makes their way to the other side of the stadium and into the bleachers where they’ll time the 40-yard dash. Teams place scouts on the 10, 20 and 40-yard lines to record times. At the 40, Fitterer, Dodds and director of college scouting Matt Berry all sit with stopwatches in hand, while Berry is also on the phone to relay their times up to Parrish, who will record them on his computer in the suite. This is important work, but it can also get a little mundane, which is why they find ways to have a little bit of fun with it. When a player false starts, everyone holds up their stopwatch to see who was quickest to start then stop their clock. When Dodds “wins” on a false start, he talks some trash to his co-workers and tells Berry to make sure he radios the news up to the suite. The scouts also each make a pick of who will run the fastest in this position group, and this morning Berry gets to celebrate when TCU’s Aviante Collins runs the fastest time among offensive linemen. It’s also considered a small victory when all three stopwatches, which rarely differ by more than a couple hundredths of a second, all record the exact same time. “We’ve got to pass the time,” Berry says. And if you’re curious why so much effort goes into timing 40 times at the combine when there will eventually be an “official” time provided, it’s because the Seahawks use those handheld times as their official times when it comes to the draft evaluation process, assuring that these times will offer a consistent comparison to the handheld times recorded at on-campus Pro Days where electronic timing might not be available. Back in the suite after O-line workouts, it’s midday now and lunch is being served. Carroll is multitasking— of course he is— watching college tape of an offensive lineman on a tablet while also glancing down to the field, then back up at the TV in front of him that is tuned into the NFL Network. He floats around the room, consulting with everyone from offensive line coach Tom Cable to Kirchner to Parrish to various area scouts to his two sons, assistant offensive line coach Brennan Carroll and assistant wide receivers coach Nate Carroll. Between workouts, Schneider and Carroll check out Saturday Night Live clips on Carroll’s laptop. When a prospect posts a workout number that’s something of an outlier, Kirchner is able to, in a matter of seconds, pull up a spreadsheet to show Carroll how players who posted a similar number have performed in the NFL. As much as player evaluation depends on having an eye for talent, this operation also requires a lot of technology, which is evident in the laptops and tablets scattered throughout a suite that doesn’t have quite enough outlets to go around. As running backs prepare for their chance to run the 40, recently-promoted running backs coach Chad Morton doesn’t bother trying to contain his excitement. “Let’s go!” he shouts, clapping his hands while pacing around the suite. “I even get excited to watch them warm up.” On the field, meanwhile, other scouts are busy helping organize the drills. National scout Josh Graff measures the broad jump, while midlands area scout Aaron Hineline serves 177


2017 Seattle Seahawks Yearbook
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